Monthly Archives: March 2015

Book a Tablet in the Library!

GavinTablet3Tablets are now available to borrow in the library! You can borrow a tablet to use anywhere in the building, but these tablets are an especially great way to take advantage of the Flynn Discovery and Collaboration Space (the DisCo). Each one has an application called AirMedia installed, allowing you to project presentations, videos, and documents onto the screens. Powerpoint, Word, and Excel are also included, making them a great resource for group projects.

After signing a user agreement at the circulation desk, book a tablet anywhere from one hour to two weeks in advance by clicking “Book a Tablet” under the library tab in MyHill. The loan period is one hour, but you may book a tablet for up to three consecutive hours. If you need more time, renew it for an extra hour, as long as another booking hasn’t been placed. Just be sure not to leave personal data on a tablet and be careful while using it – it will be cleared once you return it, and you are responsible for any damage done to it.

Stop in during reference hours and a reference librarian will be happy to help you use the tablets, as well as other technology in the DisCo. They will walk you through the steps to connect to AirMedia and explain all the features available. We want to make sure you’re using this exciting new space to its fullest potential!

If you have any questions about our new tablet policies, feel free to call the Circulation Desk or have a look through our DisCo LibGuide, or visit the Library tab in myHill and click on “Book a Tablet” in the “General Library Services” box.

By Gavin Damore ’16

Stonehill’s First Woman Alumni – Luice Moncey ’53

1953Moncey by FarrarLuice Moncey ’53

A member of the Class of 1953, Luice Moncey has the distinction of being the first female graduate at Stonehill. Originally founded as an all-male institution, Stonehill became coed in the fall of 1951. A resident of Avon, MA at the time, she previously studied at UMass, but was unhappy. Her mother saw a small article in the Brockton Enterprise, and Luice fell in love with the College on her first visit.

The decision to transfer did not come without challenges. Moncey assumed coed meant a 50-50 split, but as it turned out she was one of only 19 women who enrolled that year. Women accounted for 7% of the total enrollment. She recalled in a 2003 oral history interview, how surprised she was to walk into a class with no girls. Most of the other coeds were freshman and as a junior she was not enrolled in similar classes. However, the experience taught her how to “accept men as friends.”

2003Luice MonceyEven though she was at Stonehill for just two short years, she left her mark, joining several groups including The Summit, Speech Arts Society, Acres, Rifle and Pistol Club, Jazz Club, Ring Committee, Radio Division and Dorm Committee. As a senior, she was the yearbook editor, a news editor for The Summit and President of the Speech Arts Society. She graduated Magna Cum Laude in the top 10% of her class.

After leaving Stonehill she received a fellowship at Emerson College and earned a PhD at Bridgewater State College and worked as a teacher. An active alum she continues to support the college.

Celebrating Pi Day

piday

While you were enjoying Spring Break, Pi Day was celebrated all over the world. If you missed it, don’t worry! It is never too late to celebrate Pi, perhaps the most famous and beautiful of all numbers. This year is the Pi day of the century because it is 3.14.15. Hopefully, if you celebrated Pi Day, you celebrated the full ten digits of Pi at 9:26:53 either AM or PM.

 

The Pi Day website explains the history of this most famous number:

piday2“By measuring circular objects, it has always turned out that a circle is a little more than 3 times its width around. In the Old Testament of the Bible (1 Kings 7:23), a circular pool is referred to as being 30 cubits around, and 10 cubits across. The mathematician Archimedes used polygons with many sides to approximate circles and determined that Pi was approximately 22/7. The symbol (Greek letter “π”) was first used in 1706 by William Jones. A ‘p’ was chosen for ‘perimeter’ of circles, and the use of π became popular after it was adopted by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in 1737. In recent years, Pi has been calculated to over one trillion digits past it’s decimal. Only 39 digits past the decimal are needed to accurately calculate the spherical volume of our entire universe, but because of Pi’s infinite & patternless nature, it’s a fun challenge to memorize, and to computationally calculate more and more digits.”

Many people celebrated Pi Day, including colleges, museums, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and even Penzey’s Spice where they are celebrating Pi and Pie. As Scientific American explains, this is exactly the right way to celebrate the holiday, “Pi fans [celebrated] this weekend with a wealth of math- (and baked goods–) related opportunities. Traditionalists will of course bake pies, both because of the pun and because of their circular nature (not to mention their tastiness). For the sugar-averse, pizzas have the right shape, and the right first two letters as well.”

To continue the Pi Day holiday the library has many math-themed movies including Good Will Hunting, A Beautiful Mind and Proof.

The library’s databases, including Academic Search Complete, JSTOR and ScienceDirect, also have good coverage of all things related to Mathematics.

Many people are celebrating Pi Day colleges, museums, even Penzey’s Spice where they are celebrating Pi and Pie. As Scientific American explains that is exactly the right way to celebrate the holiday,” Pi fans can celebrate this weekend with a wealth of math- (and baked goods–) related opportunities. Traditionalists will of course bake pies, both because of the pun and because of their circular nature (not to mention their tastiness). For the sugar-averse, pizzas have the right shape, and the right first two letters as well.”

To continue the Pi Day holiday the library has many Math Themed movies including Good Will Hunting, A Beautiful Mind and Proof.

The library’s databases Academic Search Complete, JSTOR and ScienceDirect have good coverage of all things related to Mathematics