Monthly Archives: September 2016

Brain Drives, Climate Change, and Doing Good: A Neurosurgeon’s Dilemma

Stonehill is celebrating the second year of the Growing Climate Justice at Stonehill Initiative showcasing different events focusing on justice and the climate. Building on last year’s success, 2016-2017 will feature more thought-provoking speakers and events. The first event of the Fall will be held tomorrow, Thursday, September 22 at 7:00 PM in the Martin Institute. There will be a public lecture entitled “Brain Drives, Climate Change, and Doing Good: A Neurosurgeon’s Dilemma” by Dr. Ann-Christine Duhaime, the Nicholas T. Zervas Professor of Neurosurgery, Harvard Medical School.

As part of the Growing Climate Justice at Stonehill Initiative. Dr. Duhaime’s talk should give us better insight into how our brains can thwart our efforts at climate change. Senior Neuroscience major, Nicole Pirro ’17 explains:

“Thursday’s talk by Dr. Anne-Christine Duhaime should be extremely interesting as it will explain three different items of discussion and why this could be an obstacle for a Neurosurgeon. In previous talks that can be viewed online, Dr. Duhaime has taken the big picture and broken it down so students and faculty of other disciplines will easily understand the point that she is trying to get across. The human brain has evolved to respond quickly to certain stimuli in order to stay alive. Therefore, our brains are not wired to think about large, slow moving threats such as climate change. However, the human brain does work with a reward system that will affect how one behaves. I’m eager to see how Dr. Duhaime will connect and explain the relationships between brain drive, climate change and doing good with Neuroscience and relevant research.”

For more information about this, and other Climate Justice events on campus, visit the Climate Justice page at libguides.stonehill.edu/climate.

IT @ The Library

img_8278Having trouble connecting to wifi? Been locked out of your account? IT Specialists are back working at the library during evening hours. Stop by the Reference Desk to get help.

Hours:
Monday – Thursday  6:00 – 10:00pm
Sunday 2:00 – 10:00pm

Bring your questions and your laptop or just stop by to say hi!

Library Video Tutorials

videotutorialDo you want your students to learn about a particular library resource or service, but don’t have time for in-class instruction from a librarian? Maybe your students have had some instruction, but you want them to have a refresher available on demand?

Do you want a little help when faced with an unfamiliar database at 3 am? Where do you go if you want to SEE the steps involved in setting up an interlibrary loan account and using ILLiad?

MacPhaidin Library instructional videos may be the answer!

Videos are available 24/7 and most are two to four minutes in length. They can be a way to engage visual and auditory learners, and provide an alternative when face to face library instruction is not possible. Videos can be embedded in eLearn courses, added to web pages, and sent via email.

We have videos that provide user instruction on specific databases, including JSTOR, Academic Search Complete, PubMed, and WorldCat. Links to these videos are placed at the point of use: near the corresponding database in the Electronic Resources list, and in the Finding Articles tab in library guides for individual disciplines or specific classes.

Other videos discuss research related topics such as Understanding Primary and Secondary Sources and How to Choose the Right Database. Still others describe library services, including Creating an Interlibrary Loan Account and Using Course Reserves.

Many videos are created by the library in-house. Others are selected by librarians from videos produced by database vendors like Ebsco, ProQuest, Lexis-Nexis, PubMed, and others.

All videos are available in the Library Video Tutorial Guide, along with links for sharing via email and embedding in eLearn class pages. Most library videos are also available on the Library‘s YouTube channel.

The library continues to create videos and to look for more videos from our vendors. Your suggestions for new videos are welcome!

For more information and to submit suggestions, contact Joe Middleton, 508 565-1433, jmiddleton@stonehill.edu

https://stonehill.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=da410096-1e9d-4518-8103-ccebf14cf372

Changes to the Bloomberg Training Course

Here’s some news for Bloomberg users. As of Wednesday, August 31 2016, the Bloomberg Essentials BESS <GO> (commonly known as “Bloomberg Certification”) function has been replaced with the new Bloomberg Market Concepts BMC<GO> function. Now, when a student types BESS <GO> into the Terminal, they will be automatically forwarded to BMC <GO>.

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is an 8-hour, self-paced, e-learning video course consisting of four modules (Economic Indicators, Currencies, Fixed Income and Equities) and over 70 Bloomberg Terminal functions. After completing all four modules, students receive a certificate of completion.

BMC can be taken for free on any of the Bloomberg Terminals in Stanger. Students can also opt to complete BMC on the Bloomberg Institute website for a fee.

Bloomberg promises to release several enhancements to the BMC course over the next 12 months. For more information, see the Bloomberg Guide or contact Joe Middleton, x1433, jmiddleton@stonehill.edu.

bloomberg

The Human Library is Coming to Stonehill, and We’re Looking for Volunteer “Books”!

The Human LibraryAre you a single parent? LGBTQ+? Holy Cross Priest? Athiest? Police Officer? Immigrant? Would you be interested in talking about your experiences in a safe space? The Human Library is coming to Stonehill, and we’re looking for volunteer “books”!

Created in 2000 by the Danish youth organization Stop The Violence, the Human Library program is now active on five continents, where it enables individuals to “establish a safe conversational space, where difficult questions are expected, appreciated and hopefully answered. … It was developed to challenge societal prejudices wherever and for whatever reasons they occur, and to help people form a better understanding of those with whom they share their communities.”

We are seeking volunteers to be our “books.” Our Human Library event will take place on Thursday, October 27, from 1pm-4pm in the MacPhaidin Library. When you participate in the Human Library, you are available to be taken out on loan for thirty-minute conversations intended to challenge prejudice. Human Books are individuals who have experienced discrimination based on their race, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, religion, or other aspects of their identity. Human Books choose titles that reflect the identity and experience they are open to discussing, “in order to challenge the Reader to reflect on the stigmatization that occurs.”

Can I be a book?

We invite volunteers who have experienced hardship or discrimination in some aspect of their lives to be our books, to challenge our community to have open, honest discussions about individuals’ lived experiences. Want to volunteer? Sign up here.

What titles make for “good” books?

Titles are simple and straightforward, so that Readers understand what topic you are available to discuss. Examples could include: Bipolar, Muslim, Eating Disorder, Transgender, African American, Recovering alcoholic, Single parent, First generation student, Police Officer, Athiest, Disabled, Immigrant, Activist. If you have a topic you’d like to propose but are uncertain about its relevance, please contact us! You can use the online form here.

How many books do you need?

As many as we can get!

Who do I contact to participate?

Contact reference@stonehill.edu, 508-565-1203 to volunteer to be a “book”!  Or fill out our form. We will also be sending out details on how to participate as a Reader closer to the date for our Human Library event.

What’s Up Thursdays

Black Lives Matter

Photo by 5chw4r7z https://www.flickr.com/photos/5chw4r7z/17139584230/

Are you involved looking for a space to process social justice issues and what they mean to you? Are you feeling overwhelmed by or unsure about current events? Or are you seeking ways to deepen your engagement with social justice issues and the questions they raise? Whether you are involved in issues of social justice, diversity, and inclusion at the personal level, within the Stonehill community, or more broadly, we invite you to join us for “What’s Up Thursdays – A Community Conversation.”

Over the summer, Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, and Mission came together to create this bi-weekly brown back lunch series as a time for our community to deepen dialogue and reflect on national occurrences.  Vice President for Student Affairs Pauline Dobrowski notes that “with everything going on in our world, it is important that we take time to come together as a community to reflect, share perspectives, and discuss the impact of events on ourselves and our campus.  While these can be difficult conversations, we’ve found that providing a safe space in which folks can process and dialogue is critical.”

Through our conversations we seek to:

  • Deepen dialogue and reflection about occurrences surrounding issues of diversity, inclusion, and social justice
  • Develop space to join in community to process the events and the impact on self, others, and community
  • Provide support and resources for our community to engage in ongoing reflective and processing practices

Senior Melissa Mardo ’17 writes: “I have been going to What’s Up Thursdays since the summer because it provides a space on campus to engage in dialogue around real world issues and current events. Not everyone at Stonehill is eager to talk about these issues, so it’s nice going to What’s Up knowing that while people may feel differently than myself about these issues, we all want to have these conversations together. IT can be hard to process what’s going on in the news when you have to focus on class readings and club meetings, so I am thankful that Stonehill carves time out of the academic schedule to say ‘come take the time and let’s talk about this as a community.’”

What should I expect?

Each conversation will begin with introductory questions and reflection, before moving into a deeper engagement with that week’s topic. You are encouraged to listen, reflect, and participate as much as you are comfortable. Many of these conversations will have moments that make us uncomfortable or challenge us to reflect on our experiences in new ways; these difficult conversations are central to our community’s critical engagement with social justice issues.

During the Fall Semester, conversations will take place at noon in the DisCo, MacPhaidin Library, on the following dates:

  • Sept. 15
  • Sept. 29
  • Oct. 13
  • Oct. 27
  • Nov 10
  • Dec 1

Feel free to drop in, bring your lunch, and be prepared to dialogue on the topic of the week!

Looking for more resources?

If you’d like to read more about the social justice and the issues covered by national news media this summer, consider checking out these books:

 

You can check out a 2015 speech by Dr. Jaime Washington, titled “Defining Moments: Black, Christian and Gay – A Life of Learning, Healing, Growth and Change” here.

If you have any questions about the “What’s Up Thursdays” program, please contact Connie Cabello, Director of Intercultural Affairs, ccabello@stonehill.edu, 508.565.1411

The Human Library Comes to Stonehill

The Human LibraryYou’ve no doubt heard the old adage “don’t judge a book by its cover.” We’re taught that the same concept applies to individuals. While this seems simple enough, in reality it is deceptively difficult to achieve. So how do we make ourselves more aware of our snap judgments and initial assumptions and work to acknowledge and change them, rather than deny that they exist?

 

This is one of the goals of the Human Library, coming to the MacPhaidin Library this fall! Created in 2000 by the Danish youth organization Stop The Violence, the Human Library program is now active on five continents, where it enables individuals to “establish a safe conversational space, where difficult questions are expected, appreciated and hopefully answered. … It was developed to challenge societal prejudices wherever and for whatever reasons they occur, and to help people form a better understanding of those with whom they share their communities.”

 

We are seeking volunteers to be our “books.” When you participate in the Human Library, you are available to be taken out on loan for thirty-minute conversations intended to challenge prejudice. Human Books are individuals who have experienced discrimination based on their race, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, religion, or other aspects of their identity. Human Books choose titles that reflect the identity and experience they are open to discussing, “in order to challenge the Reader to reflect on the stigmatization that occurs.”

 

Can I be a book?

We invite volunteers who have experienced hardship or discrimination in some aspect of their lives to be our books, to challenge our community to have open, honest discussions about individuals’ lived experiences.

 

What titles make for “good” books?

Titles are simple and straightforward, so that Readers understand what topic you are available to discuss. Examples could include: Bipolar, Muslim, Eating Disorder, Transgender, African American, Recovering alcoholic, Single parent, First generation student, Police Officer, Atheist, Disabled, Immigrant, Activist. If you have a topic you’d like to propose but are uncertain about its relevance, please contact us!

 

How many books do you need?

As many as we can get!

 

How do I find out more?

If you are interested in participating in our Human Library, please contact us at reference@stonehill.edu and we will provide you with additional information. We will also be sending out details on how to participate as a Reader closer to the date for our Human Library event.

 

Student User Survey Update

In 2015, the MacPhaidin Library began a Student User Study.  Students were asked to swipe their HillCards at the end of instruction sessions and after asking reference questions .  As of September 1st, 2016, this is a snapshot of who we are helping and how.

FY16 Swipe Infographic JPG