Category Archives: Electronic Resources

Earth Day & eBooks

Earth Day and eBooks

Are you looking for ways to cut down on your environmental impact this Earth Day? Did you know you can highlight, bookmark, and take notes online in library eBooks? As a student, printing material for your classes is probably high on your list of reasons to use the library. Last year printing in the Library used 1850 reams of paper! If you’re looking for ways to save paper, make sure you check out our eBooks.

 

Making the most of eBooks

 

Ebrary, our ebook platform, incorporates a number of annotation tools. You can also download eBooks to use offline, copy sections along with a citation to incorporate into your papers, search for specific words or phrases, and print small sections of titles

 

To use many of these features of ebrary, the first step is to create an account. To create an account, click on “Sign In” in the upper-right corner of any ebrary page, then select “Create an account.” Once you have an account, you can save titles to your bookshelf as well as take and save notes.

 

Watch this brief video for an introduction to some of the ebrary Reader’s main features:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueDvI4dQXhs

 

Here, you can see more about using ebrary’s annotation tools:
https://youtu.be/Vb_sM2zrm7w?list=PL-aFAdxOSTDe55g_BFQf_3ipSV1Ru4TBw

 

And last but not least, this video shows you how to download an ebrary for offline reading:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Df8AyFfBKyk

 

If you have additional questions about using Library eBooks, visit the ebrary Help page or contact a Reference Librarian at reference@stonehill.edu, 508-565-1203.

Making the Most of eBooks

Making the most of ebooks

 

Did you know you can highlight, bookmark, and take notes online in library ebooks? Ebrary, our ebook platform, incorporates a number of annotation tools. You can also download ebooks to use offline, copy sections along with a citation to incorporate into your papers, search for specific words or phrases, and print small sections of titles

 

To use many of these features of ebrary, the first step is to create an account. To create an account, click on “Sign In” in the upper-right corner of any ebrary page, then select “Create an account.” Once you have an account, you can save titles to your bookshelf as well as take and save notes.

 

Watch this brief video for an introduction to some of the ebrary Reader’s main features:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueDvI4dQXhs

 

Here, you can see more about using ebrary’s annotation tools:
https://youtu.be/Vb_sM2zrm7w?list=PL-aFAdxOSTDe55g_BFQf_3ipSV1Ru4TBw

 

And last but not least, this video shows you how to download an ebrary for offline reading:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Df8AyFfBKyk

 

If you have additional questions about using Library ebooks, visit the ebrary Help page or contact a Reference Librarian at reference@stonehill.edu, 508-565-1203.

Changes to the Bloomberg Training Course

Here’s some news for Bloomberg users. As of Wednesday, August 31 2016, the Bloomberg Essentials BESS <GO> (commonly known as “Bloomberg Certification”) function has been replaced with the new Bloomberg Market Concepts BMC<GO> function. Now, when a student types BESS <GO> into the Terminal, they will be automatically forwarded to BMC <GO>.

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is an 8-hour, self-paced, e-learning video course consisting of four modules (Economic Indicators, Currencies, Fixed Income and Equities) and over 70 Bloomberg Terminal functions. After completing all four modules, students receive a certificate of completion.

BMC can be taken for free on any of the Bloomberg Terminals in Stanger. Students can also opt to complete BMC on the Bloomberg Institute website for a fee.

Bloomberg promises to release several enhancements to the BMC course over the next 12 months. For more information, see the Bloomberg Guide or contact Joe Middleton, x1433, jmiddleton@stonehill.edu.

bloomberg

HARI: A New Way to Research

4520018121_806712ef8f_oIn person webinar: join colleagues in the Library DisCo at 11:30am on 3/14.

This webinar will open at 11:30am on Monday, March 14th. To access the webinar at this time, click on the link; a download of “Zoom_launcher.exe” should start automatically. On a Windows computer, click on the downloaded file in your browser, then click “Run.”  On a Mac, you will be prompted to download a .zip file of the Zoom Launcher.  Once that is saved, double-click on the .zip file and then double-click “ZoomusLauncher” to install.  The webinar room will be live at 11:30am on Monday.

We are in the process of implementing a new, patents pending inference engine for Stanford in collaboration with a Silicon Valley start-up that is a completely new way to extract meaning and knowledge across multiple sources.  In effect this discovery environment produces inferential semantic relationships among millions of digital documents (articles, books, websites, — any digital  text really) in a wide and expanding range of subject and genres with clear links to the documents if licensed and to information about the documents enabling purchase on demand, potentially a pay-per-view option.

The method, Hyper-Association of Related Inferences (HARI has been developed by an Italian mathematician named Ruggero Grammatica, a friend. The technology combines machine learning, natural language processing, and a succession of algorithms. HARI ingests enormous amounts of ie-texts efficiently, then uses algorithms to determine relationships among concepts, providing a tool for browsing or discovery. (This is at least a thousand times more difficult to put into words than to grasp when you see a demonstration.)  There is an instantiation that has ingested and analyzed 22+ million Medline entries, though more interesting and extensive results arise when full texts are analyzed.

One way to think of it:
Google provides specific answers to specific queries. It’s like a library, such as the library of Congress, in which, instead of gaining access to the stacks, you write down the name of a book, give it to a librarian, and are then given the book for which you asked and only that book.

HARI, by contrast, is like browsing in library stacks. One will find specific information that was sought, but other connections among related concepts will be exposed, and some, perhaps many, of those will be unexpected.

The HARI engine is based on NLP, AI, and custom algorithms that allow the processing of huge amounts of text based information and the extraction of concepts (not keywords).  The concepts are then correlated and identify relationships and inferences on the chosen topic, ultimately revealing the full texts containing the concepts.  It is a semantically based process that can be “tuned” by the end user both in the front end of a search and once results are obtained.

This complements our existing list and link type of search engine tools that academic users, both students and faculty, typically use today. HARI returns a more in-depth, visual result from each search.   At any moment the user can explore any of the concepts displayed and new streams of correlations are presented suggesting new paths of investigation.  And through use of the links, a researcher might be directed to licensed source documents or to a pay per view interface.  The benefits to publishers would be substantial; we wish to engage with you and others to elaborate and extend HARI dramatically.  The benefits to students and professors as well as many other professionals who make use of information resources hiding in thickets of content are also dramatic.

 

New Ejournals Portal

Changes to Full-Text Journal Searching

The Library’s full-text journal search enables users to check to see whether or not the library has full-text access to articles within a particular journal title, and for what dates. You can access this search from the Library’s website by using the drop down menu in the “Library Search” box and selecting “Ejournals.”

librarysearch

The full-text journal search is also available on the Information for Faculty page and the Library Resources page. Recently, Ebsco has updated this resource; as part of our license agreement, off-campus users will now be asked to authenticate prior to using our eJournals resource for full-text journal searches.

Previously, you would be asked to log in with your username, barcode and PIN after searching the eJournals portal, when you clicked on the link for a specific journal title. This change means the point of login is earlier to ensure that only Stonehill users are accessing licensed content.

The search functions themselves have also been updated. When you visit the full-text journal search directly, you’ll now see a landing page that looks like this:

ejournalsscreenHere, you can browse our full-text journals by discipline, as well as search for a specific journal title. Through this update, Ebsco has greatly improved their search features, making searching more targeted and accurate. When you search for a title, such as Nature, you will see that title, followed by the database where you can gain full-text access and the dates of availability. If there is a delay in availability of, you will see a note that tells you there is a “Full Text Delay” and its duration.

searchresults

If you have not previously set up a PIN for off-campus access, please visit our off-campus access page for instructions on how to do so. If you have any questions, please contact the Reference Librarians via email (reference@stonehill.edu) or by phone at 508-565-1203.

New look for Electronic Journals Full-text search

Students, staff and faculty will soon see a new look when using our electronic journals full-text search (also known as A-to-Z). You can see a preview of the new look below. This update from EBSCO streamlines the search process and provides easier access to browsing by discipline. If you experience any problems with Electronic Journals searching during this time, please contact Reference at reference@stonehill.edu or call 508-565-1203

ebscoejournals

New! Book Chapters in JStor

This fall, the library has expanded its JStor collection to include ebook chapters. When you conduct a search in JStor, you will now see both Journal Articles and Chapters in your search results.

In this search for material on the poet Claudia Rankine, you see two results. One for her poem “Atlantic Shores,” published in the Mississippi Review, notes on the right that it is from a journal. The second result is a chapter from the book American Hybrid Poets. On the right, you’ll see that this is designated as a Chapter.

 

You can download, save, and print book chapters the same way you would download a JStor article. To see all the chapters available in a particular book, click on the book title. This will take you to the JStor page for that book, including its full table of contents:

 

To use JStor books, visit JStor while on HillSpot, or authenticate to the Stonehill network from off campus. Conduct your search as you would normally, and both journal articles and book chapters will be displayed in your results. If you wish to see only book chapters, click on the “Books” tab in your search results.

 

For Faculty

JStor books are free of digital rights management (DRM) software. This means that any JStor book chapter can be placed on electronic reserve for your course, and students can freely download and print these book chapters. In addition, you can link to the full table of contents for the book by using the Stable URL provided by JStor.

 

Soon, all JStor ebooks will also be available within HillSearch. If you have any questions about using JStor, or our other library databases and ebook collections, contact reference@stonehill.edu or call 508-565-1203.

Streaming Videos on Swank

thebreakfastclubLooking for a movie to watch online? Try Swank, our new database of films chosen by our professors and  available for everyone. Swank streaming video enables students to watch films without having to go to the library and get the DVD on reserve. The titles are all available in the catalog, or you can browse them from the Swank Platform. New titles will be added as professors select them.

Available films include recent releases such as Her and the Imitation Game, as well as other studio releases including Django Unchained, The Social NetworkThe Matrix, and classic favorites including The Breakfast Club.

Titles can be viewed on campus as well as off by authenticating to the campus network using your library account. Please note that Swank does not work with the Chrome browser. We recommend using Firefox to access Swank titles.

These films are available for individual viewing and in-class use.  Due to studio restrictions, we are unable to obtain public performance rights for Swank films, so they cannot be shown in group settings.

Using The New York Times Institutional Subscription

An Academic Site License using NYTimes Group Passes provides users with full access to NYTimes.com and the NYTimes.com smartphone apps:

  • The Stonehill community will now have access to all current content, including articles, videos, images, and other multi-media content, available on NYTimes.com.
  • Enjoy access to NYTimes.com from any device.
  • Once activated from within your school’s network, an NYTimes.com Group Pass can be used from any location for the duration of your license period.

Is there anything I can’t access?

There’s very little you don’t have access to. However, our new subscription does not include e-reader editions, Premium Crosswords or The New York Times Crosswords apps.

What if I am doing research and want older material?

For full access to early editions of the NYTimes, including those published before 1980, users should still access the New York Times through our Proquest Historical Newspapers subscription (coverage begins in 1851) or our Gale subscription. We also have access to Proquest Digital Microfilm for 2009-present, with a three month embargo. The new Group Pass provides enhanced access to the most recent online content and multimedia materials.

How do I get started?

To activate your pass, you must be on campus and connected to the internet via HillSpot. While physically on campus and on our network:

  1. Go to nytimes.com/grouppass.
  2. Create a NYTimes.com account using your school email address. If you already have a NYTimes.com account using your school email address, you may log in with those credentials.
  3. When you see START YOUR ACCESS, the expiration time and date of your pass will appear. Each pass must have an expiration date. Our campus setting is that accounts expire after one year, so that each user will only have to register once per year.
  4. Go to NYTimes.com and enjoy your full access from any location!

Please note: Once you have activated the Group Pass provided by Stonehill, you will have full access until your expiration date with no further action on your part. However, if for any reason while on NYTimes.com you are served the message that you are reaching the limit of free articles on the site, do the following:

Make sure you are logged in to the NYTimes.com account with which you activated your Group Pass. If you log out of your account or visit NYTimes.com on a device where you are not logged in, you can simply log in to your account to continue enjoying access.

Can I use my Smartphone App?

Yes! Stonehill’s Group Pass includes access to The New York Times via the NYTimes smartphone apps. Download your free smartphone apps by visiting: http://www.nytimes.com/services/mobile/index.html

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Below are answers to frequently asked questions, provided by the NYTimes. If you have further questions, please contact us at reference@stonehill.edu or, for technical difficulties, contact the NYTimes site license support at edu@nytimes.com for assistance or View their complete FAQ »

 

NYTimes.com Group Pass FAQ’s

Why use the Group Pass to read The New York Times online?

The New York Times charges for full access to its digital edition, NYTimes.com. Visitors to the site are capped at viewing 10 articles each month before charges take effect. The Group Pass gives you unlimited access to all content on the site, with the exception of a limitation on the number of articles you can view from the archive period 1923-1980 (However, you have full access to archived articles from 1923-1980 through our other database subscriptions, listed in our Electronic Resources Libguide).

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I already have a NYTimes.com digital subscription. What should I do?

If you have an existing paid NYTimes.com digital subscription, you are not eligible to activate a Group Pass. You should continue to access The Times via your own subscription.

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Should I cancel my existing subscription to make use of the site license access?

The New York Times Academic Site License has some restrictions that your personal subscription does not have.

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What are the restrictions?

Site license access does not include the NYTimes.com tablet apps. At this time, access to articles from the date range 1923 to 1980 is limited is limited to 5 articles for the entire duration of your pass.

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Can I access The Times off-campus?

Yes, as long as you have previously activated your Group Pass from within your school’s network, e.g. its designated IP ranges while on campus. You cannot activate a Group Pass from a proxy server from an off-campus location.

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Can I access the Times from my mobile device?

There are mobile apps for iPhone/iPod Touch (IOS 5.0+), Android (OS 2.1+), and Windows (7.5 O.S.) phones; these are included as part of the Group Pass. Mobile apps for tablets are not part of the Group Pass. However, you can access the NYTimes.com mobile site (mobile.nytimes.com) using your smartphone or tablet running one of the above operating systems.

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Why am I asked to log in on some occasions and not others?

This may be because your browser may clear its web cache/history if it is set to do so. In such cases you will need to log back into to NYTimes.com, but you still have your Group Pass.

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Do campuses alumni have access?

No, only current students, faculty and staff are entitled to activate a Group Pass.